Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
of money. >>> in the line of fire. cnn is embedded with u.s. troops in afghanistan when the taliban attack. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the situation room. a special gathering to tackle america's serious economic problems. key figures from government, business and academia came together this week in chicago for the clinton global might be difference america conference. the event was the brainchild of former president bill clinton. i sat down with him in chicago for a candid interview on the country's debt crisis, the 2012 presidential race, and much more. >> mr. president, thanks very much for joining us. good to be here. first time you've done this as far as the u.s. economy is concerned. normally it's global issues. and i want to get to that, but let's talk about some of the big issues right now. jobs, jobs, jobs. it's a crisis, a game of chicken going on in washington right now between the president, the did democrats on one side, republican leadership on the other side. how big of a deal is this august 2nd deadli
when negotiations with the taliban move forward and it also may have very big repercussions for the u.s. effort in the south. people called president hamid karzai's brother a corrupt gangster. but the cia's former head of counterterrorism says the u.s. may miss him. >> it's quite like live that what follows is going to be something that will not work to our interest. >> reporter: an afghan official says he was gunned down in his own home, shot in the head and chest by his own guard. the taliban took credit, but it's not clear if the shooter was really working for them. >> the united states condemns in the strongest possible terms the murder of president karzai's half brother in kandahar. >> a u.s. official said quote, while we must deal with ahm ahmed wali karzai, he's widely understood to be corrupt and narcotics trafficker. the state department and u.s. military were trying to build trust in the afghan government. they frequently criticized ahmed wali, but the cia worked with him. >> i think often parts of the u.s. government were working at cross purposes where ahmed wali was conce
going to the taliban? well, it's a little confusing but it has to do with a $2.16 billion transportation contract that the united states has to promote afghan businesses and within that, in the fine print somewhere could be that your tax dollars will fund the taliban. >> in particular, a whole bunch of money is going to fund trucking operations across afghanistan to get military supplies different places and it sounds like a lot of the money that we are giving these eight various trucking companies somehow winds up and we have tracked the money. it goes from our coffers directly through big shots in the afghanistan government and winds up in the pockets of the insurgents. >> we usually do that in iraq. we did it through private contractors. this time we want to try to build up the local economy by hiring local afghans that have affiliations with the local taliban that pay off the taliban not to attack the american stuff. >> why don't we just pay the taliban directly? >> might as well be. it's our money. it's $2.16 billion has gone into the pockets of the taliban, petraeus put a commissi
the taliban to peace talk in the period when the u.s. forces draw down. it is key to keep pressure up now to give the country a chance of some reconciliation. speaking in capped har, the new defense chief said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces. he acknowledged that the remain, "a lot more work to do in terms of being able to transition the responsibility to them." now that leon panetta has moved to iraq, his focus will be on the situation there and concerns as he said here about iranian weapons smuggling. after all, 15 u.s. troops were killed there last month. back to you. >> shannon: all right, david. thank you very much. crews in india are scrambling through wreckage at this hour, desperately searching for survivors of a deadly train crash. more than 100 people were hurt and at least 31 killed when this express train derailed near the city of luknow. the death toll has been rising all morning long. the train was heading to new delhi from calcutta when officials say 12 cars skidded off the tracks. ♪ ♪ >> shannon: much of the debate over reigning in th
back here. we went to afghanistan to get the taliban out, get al qaeda out and to get osama bin laden. we got osama bin laden. al qaeda is no longer in afghanistan. and the taliban is gone. so what are we still doing there? why are we still there? why are we still spending about $14 billion a month in afghanistan? so, mr. president, again, we need a balanced approach. spending cuts alone won't do the job. i think the kweupbdz have -- i think the republicans have just proved this. republicans have proved that spending cuts alone will not get the job done. how do i say that? look at the republican budget, the so-called ryan budget. it dismandate also medicare, guts medicaid, makes severe cuts across the federal budget. yet it still adds trillions of dollars to the federal deficit for years to come largely because it refuses to touch tax breaks for the well-to-do or to raise other revenues from corporations. well, mr. president, the republicans have said they don't want to raise taxes on so-called job creators. they don't want to raise taxes on job creators. well, to call trust fund mill
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)